Expanding to Serve You Better at 151 Route 10 North, Grantham, NH

 

LOOKING FOR EXCELLENT CARE CLOSER TO HOME?

 

Cioffredi & Associates is excited to officially announce the opening date of our new Grantham Clinic is April 30!

We’ve been working hard to build our new space and can’t wait to share it with you. When you come in, you’ll find a warm and inviting clinic with an abundance of natural light. The office is serviced by one of our most experienced clinicians, Becca Swope, who will provide you with fully comprehensive and compassionate care.

Becca’s excited. Are you?

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Expanding to Serve You Better at 151 Route 10 North, Grantham, NH

 

The weather hasn’t quite received the message yet, but it’s almost May! And that means the new Grantham office opening is right around the corner.

 

Our contractors have been hard at work sprucing up the new clinic in the Grantham Greenway. We are excited to share with you a few progress pictures below.

Grantham Waiting Area Progress

Waiting Area: Before -> In Progress

Welcome to the waiting room, complete with comfy, cushioned chairs. Renovations are always a little messy, but you can start to see this cozy waiting room coming together with new walls and flooring. And don’t worry, we’re not getting rid of those beautiful windows!

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Is Your Low Back Pain Biased?

Once you’ve done a fair amount of living and put some ‘miles’ on your body, there is the possibility of some wear and tear. Whether you’ve been a physical laborer or led a relatively sedentary lifestyle; if you’re a vigorous exerciser, or perhaps have suffered a significant injury or had surgery, you may be one of the many people who live with some level of episodic back pain.

Cioffredi and Associates Treats Back Pain

Back pain can be the result of several different issues.

We in the medical profession like to categorize things and come up with a diagnosis. If we know what we’re trying to treat, then we can better help a person. However, when a diagnosis is very general, like low back pain, the term is so vague that it doesn’t provide any practical help for understanding what’s wrong or what we can do about it. Yes, something can be done about it.

Is your low back pain flexion biased or extension biased?

Flexion biased simply means that your back pain feels relief when you bend forward or round your back. In contrast, extension biased means that you get pain relief when you bend backward or increase the arch in your back.

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Goal-Setting Practice That Works

William J. Cioffredi, PT - FounderNew Year’s resolutions: most of us make them, and many fade by the first few months or even weeks. In our work, throughout the year, our purpose is to help people achieve their goals. We track every client, and our percentages are pretty high on helping people hit their target. This kind of goal-setting practice has reached beyond my professional life, and while I don’t profess to have great wisdom on the topic, I can tell you what has worked for me personally.

It’s pretty simple, and involves three steps.

1. Make your ‘resolution’ a specific goal that you can achieve. It’s something you can complete and is done. If your resolution is to exercise three times a week, that’s something you do—not an end result. What is your purpose with the exercise? For example, if you’d like to be able to spend a week exploring the coast with your grandkids in August or bike the Prouty in July, now you’ve created a purpose for exercising three times a week. When people come to us for help and we ask them what they want to accomplish with our treatment, oftentimes their response is something like, “reduce my pain and feel stronger.” While these kinds of responses are understandable, often one of our first tasks is to help the person identify the real purposes behind their goals (lifting their child, carrying groceries, stacking firewood?). Continue reading


A Reflection on Health

by Billy Cioffredi, PT

“John, how are your classes going this semester?”William J. Cioffredi, PT - Founder

“Hey Dad,” my son answered. “Most are really interesting. One required class in health education seemed like a dud, but then something really piqued my interest. The professor asked our class, ‘What do you feel are the top 2-3 problems in the country?’ and my classmates answered with obesity, racial injustice, sexual assault, the opioid crisis, and the like. I said community building.”

My son’s response really struck me; but why? It took me a moment to process the concept.

“John, I think you hit on something that is really important.”

There are many challenges in today’s world. I sometimes feel like there are so many different issues and special interest groups that there can’t possibly be enough time, energy, or resources for us to adequately address them all. Community building is just one thing, but it touches all the others—and it turns out that it’s also connected to our overall health. Continue reading


Mind Over Matter

Placebo, Confidence, and Certainty: Are They Related?

William J. Cioffredi, PT - FounderMike Pauletich believed he had undergone surgery to alleviate Parkinson’s symptoms during a trial at Stanford University in 2011. Parkinson’s disease is a difficult degenerative disease that has no cure, where current treatments simply try to retard the progression of the disease. The Stanford study involved both an actual and a “placebo” surgery in which a drug was or was not administered, and Mr. Pauletich not only had a good result from the study procedure, his outcomes far surpassed expectations. Many of the chronic effects he had experienced were actually reversed, such that you could hardly tell he had the disease at all. When the results came in at the conclusion of the research trial, those who received the actual treatment, on a whole, didn’t improve any better than the control group who had received a sham surgery. A researcher looking at the data afterwards noticed something remarkable: Mike had received the sham surgery! Continue reading


Iliotibial Band (ITB) SyndromeIliotibial Band (ITB) Diagram

Pain and Tightness Along the Thigh

Having pain and tightness along the side of the thigh is quite common, especially for athletes. When the pain encompasses the lower half of the thigh towards the outside area of the knee, it often carries the diagnosis of Iliotibial Band (ITB) Syndrome. For many people it can be persistent or unresponsive to typical treatment. The IT band is a stiff layer of tissue that blends from a broad attachment of muscles from the side and back of the hip. The band becomes narrower as it descends toward the knee where its attachment broadly blends with tissues about the knee cap and into the tibia bone. Continue reading


standing quad stretch

Pull one ankle back toward your buttock, bending your knee to stretch the front of your thigh.

First of all, effective stretching is not a total secret, though in my experience it is not a commonly understood concept. When we think about stretching, it’s often done with the idea that it’s like taking a piece of leather and, using force, mechanically lengthening it out. One of the problems with this idea is that ligaments and tendons are not designed to lengthen. Muscle tissue is designed to actively shorten and lengthen, however it will not lengthen effectively if it is held in an activated or tense state. Activation or tension causes muscle tissue to be more rigid—more leather-like—and it can be irritated if forced. That may be one reason some people don’t ‘enjoy’ the process of stretching. The other problem is that rigid tissue, like Turkish taffy, gets thinner and weaker as we forcibly stretch it out. That doesn’t sound good, especially to athletes who simultaneously want to optimize their strength.

Now, instead of thinking of leather that you are stretching and thinning out, think of a spring that has shortened, and your goal in stretching is to relax the tension of the spring. Continue reading


Bill Cioffredi, PT - Founder

In the bodywork and exercises that we use in our work, I often feel we are simply undoing what people have done to themselves. Most of our clients didn’t have an accident. Rather, they developed a painful condition gradually, often times without a known reason. Postural pain, as well as joint and muscle pain, are often the result of unknowingly tensing or activating muscles that don’t need to be working or are working too much for the demand. Herniated discs, sciatica, arthritis pain, and rotator cuff problems are all just examples that are influenced by this issue. To a large degree, our work in helping people to restore pain-free movement involves freeing up stiff tissues in joints. But then we need to teach people how to “relax” their muscles. “Release” may be a better term, as we want our clients to release the excessive tension and muscle activation—not have muscles go totally soft. Continue reading


Humanities and Health

Do you know someone who exercises regularly, but it’s almost a compulsive activity to “manage stress?” Controlling their weight is a constant “battle.” Going to their physician is a source of stress, as they wait to see what their numbers are going to be; worrying about their blood pressure, cholesterol, or other lab values they’re monitoring.William Cioffredi, PT

Then there’s the person for whom exercise and activity are enjoyments. They seem to eat sensibly, and you don’t hear them describing things that they should or shouldn’t be eating. They just generally seem to be happy, laugh easily, and seem confident without being cocky. They get sad in appropriate situations, but the sadness doesn’t persist. They don’t seem to be “battling” anything in their life. If they have a health problem, it doesn’t seem to dominate their life. Continue reading