Humanities and Health

Do you know someone who exercises regularly, but it’s almost a compulsive activity to “manage stress?” Controlling their weight is a constant “battle.” Going to their physician is a source of stress, as they wait to see what their numbers are going to be; worrying about their blood pressure, cholesterol, or other lab values they’re monitoring.William Cioffredi, PT

Then there’s the person for whom exercise and activity are enjoyments. They seem to eat sensibly, and you don’t hear them describing things that they should or shouldn’t be eating. They just generally seem to be happy, laugh easily, and seem confident without being cocky. They get sad in appropriate situations, but the sadness doesn’t persist. They don’t seem to be “battling” anything in their life. If they have a health problem, it doesn’t seem to dominate their life.

At a time when technology seems to be advancing at the speed of light, research is delving deeper and deeper into our own biology for the answers to better health. Yet our country is one of the largest consumers of pain and psychotropic medication, as well as alcohol and other drugs that help us to interface with life.

Could it be that one of the challenges with our health is that our understanding of the humanities and human behavior has not kept up with the pace of technology in the natural sciences? If it piques your interest, consider attending our Speaker Series event in May.

Learn More about our Spring 2017 Speaker Series

Featuring Dr. Cathleen Beaver and Dr. Dominic Candido, founders of Enhance Health.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 24, 2017

5:15-7:00 p.m.

Cioffredi & Associates | The Institute for Health & Human Performance

112 Etna Road, Lebanon, New Hampshire


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